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What Is Cloud Computing ? What Are The Opportunities & Risks Of Cloud Computing ?

Cloud computing is here and virtually every organization is using it in some way, shape, or form. Educating yourself and your people on the opportunities and risks associated with this technology is of the utmost importance. Let’s look at the opportunities presented by cloud computing, managing the risks associated with housing your sensitive data offsite, using virtual computing environments, and vendor management considerations as you explore your cloud options.

But there’s another, more precise meaning of cloud computing the virtualization and central management of data center resources as software-defined pools. This technical definition of cloud computing describes how public cloud service providers run their operations. The key advantage is agility: the ability to apply abstracted compute, storage, and network resources to workloads as needed and tap into an abundance of pre-built servicesFrom a customer perspective, the public cloud offers a way to gain new capabilities on demand without investing in new hardware or software. Instead, customers pay their cloud provider a subscription fee or pay for only the resources they use. Simply by filling in web forms, users can set up accounts and spin up virtual machines or provision new applications. More users or computing resources can be added on the fly—the latter in real time as workloads demand those resources thanks to a feature known as auto-scaling.

 

Service models

Infrastructure as a service (IaaS) provides access to server hardware, storage, network capacity, and other fundamental computing resources.

Platform as a service (PaaS) provides access to basic operating software and services to develop and use customer-created software applications.

Software as a service (SaaS) provides integrated access to a provider’s software applications.

Deployment models

Private cloud is accessible from an intranet, internally hosted, and used by a single organization.

Community cloud has infrastructure accessible to a specific community.

Public cloud is accessible from the internet, externally hosted, and used by the general public.

Hybrid cloud is a combination of two or more clouds.

Cloud benefits

Cloud computing provides a scalable online environment that makes it possible to handle an increased volume of work without impacting system performance. Cloud computing also offers significant computing capability and economy of scale that might not otherwise be affordable, particularly for small and medium-sized organizations, without the IT infrastructure investment. Cloud computing advantages include:

Lower capital costs — Organizations can provide unique services using large-scale computing resources from cloud service providers, and then nimbly add or remove IT capacity to meet peak and fluctuating service demands while only paying for actual capacity used.

Lower IT operating costs — Organizations can rent added server space for a few hours at a time rather than maintain proprietary servers without worrying about upgrading their resources whenever a new application version is available. They also have the flexibility to host their virtual IT infrastructure in locations offering the lowest cost.

No hardware or software installation or maintenance

Optimized IT infrastructure provides quick access to needed computing services

The risks

Environmental security — The concentration of computing resources and users in a cloud computing environment also represents a concentration of security threats. Because of their size and significance, cloud environments are often targeted by virtual machines and bot malware, brute force attacks, and other attacks. Ask your cloud provider about access controls, vulnerability assessment practices, and patch and configuration management controls to see that they are adequately protecting your data.

Data privacy and security — Hosting confidential data with cloud service providers involves the transfer of a considerable amount of an organization’s control over data security to the provider. Make sure your vendor understands your organization’s data privacy and security needs. Also, make sure your cloud provider is aware of particular data security and privacy rules and regulations that apply to your entity, such as HIPAA, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (DCI DSS), the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA), or the privacy considerations of Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act.

Data availability and business continuity — A major risk to business continuity in the cloud computing environment is loss of internet connectivity. Ask your cloud provider what controls are in place to ensure internet connectivity. If a vulnerability is identified, you may have to terminate all access to the cloud provider until the vulnerability is rectified. Finally, the seizure of a data-hosting server by law enforcement agencies may result in the interruption of unrelated services stored on the same machine.

Record retention requirements — If your business is subject to record retention requirements, make sure your cloud provider understands what they are and so they can meet them.

Disaster recovery — Hosting your computing resources and data at a cloud provider makes the cloud provider’s disaster recovery capabilities vitally important to your company’s disaster recovery plans. Know your cloud provider’s disaster recovery capabilities and ask your provider if they been tested.

 

Get a Virtual Phone System for Your Home Based Business

.If you are considering an effective communications system for your home business, you can never go wrong with a virtual phone system. Not only is it the most affordable solution available, but it will provide you with all of the features you will need in order to ensure that your business endeavor is a success.

Affordability

New home business owners are concerned with their expenditures—and for good reason. Getting started can certainly be expensive, and without an effective means of money management, it is highly unlikely that a business will succeed. A virtual phone system is truly inexpensive when compared with the alternatives, and not just on a monthly basis. There are no jacks to install and no expensive software to purchase, making the start-up costs practically non-existent. To compare monthly costs, a landline with all of the features and unlimited long distance can cost between $75 and $100 per month while a virtual system that is loaded with features aimed toward home businesses may cost as little as $20 per month.

Landline vs. Virtual System

While landlines are still considered the most traditional form of telecommunications for homes and businesses, they are certainly not the most effective. Most landline companies do not offer discounts to homeowners who choose to install second lines, and they do not offer all of the features that a virtual phone system can provide. The virtual system will allow you to separate your telephone numbers so that one is dedicated to personal use while the other is strictly for the business—without all of the added costs associated with multiple lines of service. On the same note, most of the features you need to be successful are included in the price associated with a virtual system; you may be asked to pay extra for certain features with a landline company.

Features

One of the most prominent features associated with a virtual phone system is the ability to set up an information hotline on an extension. If you are running a home business, this can save you precious time. An information hotline is available 24 hours a day, and is essentially a recorded message for your callers who are interested in learning more about the products or services you offer. It can also be used to record directions and hours of operation for your customers to hear.

Mobility

Almost all phone service providers will give you the ability to take your telephone number with you through the use of the call forwarding feature, but landline and mobile phone providers often charge for you to forward your calls. With a virtual phone system, you can easily forward your business telephone number to your mobile phone, or home or office landline if the situation calls for it. This makes you available to your clients and customers all the time, regardless of where you need to travel for personal or professional reasons.A virtual phone system is a great way for you to ensure that your home business is successful because it saves you money, provides you with features that will lend to your productivity, and allows you to be available to your customers 24 hours a day with call forwarding and information hotlines.

 

GETTING A TOLL FREE NUMBER FOR BUSINESS

If you have a small business, it is a good idea to get a toll free number. It has been proven over and over that businesses receive far more calls from customers if a number is available to them. It is beneficial to snag one which spells out a term or phrase that is relevant to your business and is easy to remember. Prepaid toll free numbers are cheap to obtain and only charge a few cents per minute. They are also convenient – packages include a number of services such as caller ID, call blocking, conference calling, voicemail/fax mailboxes and call notification emails. Look around for the services you want and need from your phone.

Any number that starts with 800, 888, 877, 866 codes are toll free. Prepaid toll free numbers are controlled by toll free service providers, called Resp Orgs, who have access to the master database of toll free numbers available in the country. This ensures that each number will be assigned only once, no matter which company is providing your number. Please note that the FCC requires that all toll free numbers be available to transfer if you need to change your service provider.Many times, dealing with a crazy load of incoming calls can be quite a hassle. Or maybe it makes you start pulling out your hair. Either way, learning how to get a prepaid toll free number is a good first step. You will be able to consolidate your personal and business calls to transfer to one phone. At the same time, getting a toll free number will allow you to easily sort and screen ALL incoming calls. Just be sure to double check that the features you want are included in the plan you choose.

The Internet has been known to work wonders and this is a perfect example. Do a search for prepaid toll free numbers, see what comes up and go from there. Do not let your business go un-called and unnoticed; be sure your relatives reach you anytime. Just make sure that the site is legit, read the fine print, and find the best price package that fits your needs. Keep an eye on both the monthly fees and the per-minute fees. Prepaid toll free numbers are a popular option. These plans charge a small monthly “maintenance fee” usually one or two dollars. Then, you just pay for the minutes used each month. Per-minute rates range from about 3.9 cents to 9.9 cents. Regardless of the services you chooseBusiness Management Articles, having your own toll free number certainly increase your profits.

 

VIRTUAL PHONE SYSTEMS FOR OFFICE PURPOSE

Setting up new branch offices and appointing new staffs to operate the business in a preferred location may not sound economical to small business entrepreneurs. Creating virtual offices is the ideal option in such a circumstance. You can stay in touch with your customers located cities apart at low cost with the aid of virtual office phone systems. These systems enable entrepreneurs to manage their offices from anywhere – even a car, home or hotel room – thus giving a high degree of physical independence.

State-of-the-art Phone Features

Virtual office phone systems are best suited for small businesses and medium businesses as they enable them to project a big business image. These phone systems are implemented through dedicated connections. Virtual PBX systems have many sophisticated features that are not found even in the latest business phone systems. The features include virtual receptionist, auto attendant, find me follow me call forwarding, call transfer, voicemail, fax mail and so on. The auto attendant system presents a menu of options such as dial by name directory, dial by extension, zero out to operator and group dialing to the callers. The sophisticated interface presented to the callers can make your business appear a flourishing one. You can even customize the auto attendant to greet the callers with their own professional greeting messages. One can receive local and toll free numbers for the desired locations from the virtual PBX service providers. The calls can be routed to the appropriate person’s mobile number or residence phone number, whatever has been provided in the phone number list, irrespective of the person’s present location. If nobody is there to attend the call, the callers will be diverted to a voicemail system, where they can leave their messages. Customers can receive their faxes in their email account using the fax mail.

Handy Phone System

Traditional PBX systems are expensive and require heavy equipments to be installed at the company premises. That is not the case with virtual office phone systems. These do not require any hardware or software to be installed at the user’s site. All the equipments are maintained at the service provider’s site itself. Moreover, these systems are scalable to a large extent; users need not worry about the additional equipments and phone lines needed while expanding their business, since all these are maintained at the provider’s location itself.

Hyundai Eon Price & Specifications

OVERVIEW ;

Introduced in October 2011, Hyundai’s mini-hatchback challenges Maruti’s ace model in the segment-Alto. While the fluidic design philosophy became a talking point, the hatchback was also considered a bit pricey compared to Alto series. Lacking diesel engine like other models in the segment, Eon is available in petrol and LPG fuel options. Mechanicals include a 800cc and 998cc petrol units mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. Check Ex Showroom Price of Eon

In its product cycle spanning five years, Hyundai Eon mini-hatchback has undergone subtle additions and is now readying for a makeover likely to come out around festive season this year. Offered with petrol and LPG options, the Eon line-up derives power from a 800cc unit and a 998cc engine just like its arch rival Alto K10. But where it misses out on is the AMT unit making do with a five-speed manual transmission.

EXTERIOR AND STYLE ;

Hyundai Eon is the smallest car to get the company’s fluidic design and the design philosophy shines the best through the car. Eon could be the car with most curves and lines in its segment, or a segment higher for that matter.Heads-on, the Hyundai Eon gets swept back headlamps with a neat chrome strip adorning the Hyundai logo. The hexagonal grille is also a part of the front bumper which is really big and gives a macho look to the front of the Eon.Sculpted bonnet and neatly designed fog lamps are a rarity for the cars in this segment.Come to the side and see the fluidic design flow through the car with beefed up wheel arches, a shoulder line that runs from the headlamps to the tail. Another sculpted line runs the length of the car between the front and rear wheels.

The shoulder line scoop upward towards the rear that makes the side profile sportier but rear window visibility is compromised. Even the door handles follow the shoulder line’s path with the rear door handles positioned slightly higher than the front ones.To the rear, the large tail lamps are well designed, following the car’s extroversive character. The rear glass is pretty wide and the rear spoiler is neatly integrated.The rear bumper is pretty meaty but is a size bigger than necessary, also making the boot less accessible by that much. The exhaust pipe is neatly hidden underneath the rear bumper, allowing for a neat layout.The Eon gets 145mm tyres with 12 inch rims for the D-Lite, D-Lite+, and ERA+ variants and 155mm tyres with larger 13 inch rims on Magna+ and Sportz variants. Both are pretty skinny and we recommend an upgrade to 165 or wider tyres for safety.

INTERIOR AND COMFORT ;

Hyundai Eon has very well-thought interior. It is airy and has a cheerful feeling to it. The materials used inside are of very good quality and the finishing of everything is done in a very nice way. Being tall, there is a lot of room inside. The legroom and headroom is ample for four adults and a kid to sit in the vehicle comfortably. Hyundai has used a lot of beige colour to make the car feel premium from the inside. The dashboard has been designed in a curvy and flowing way, and the car feels amazing, especially with the price tag it comes with. Hyundai has tried to keep things very simple and as informative as possible. The instrument panel, for instance, has only three neat pods displaying every information about the vehicle. The steering wheel feels proportionate to the interiors and feels good to hold.

The storage inside the Eon is well managed. On the centre column, the Eon gets a good audio system with premium features. The highlight of interior would be the gear shift indicator that aids the driver in saving a lot of fuel. The small budget car also comes with tilt-steering and front power windows for easy access. The centre console features tiny chrome dipped buttons, which looks snazzy. However, Hyundai could have done a better job on this part. Hyundai Eon has good quality seats and they don’t easily fatigue the occupants. The cabin space, however, is smaller than that of Alto or even Nano. With a boot space of 215 lires, the Hyundai Eon offers a good amount of space for the price it comes at. Even though the Hyundai Eon is an entry-level hatchback in the market, it is equipped with advanced features. The car gets integrated music system with many advanced features, like radio, CD player, AUX-in, ipod connectivity and USB. These features are often missing from most of the expensive cars and Hyundai has done a good job by providing these unexpected features in the vehicle. There is a set-up of four speakers in the car, which plays the sound relatively well. To manage the space in a better way; Hyundai has installed accessories, like rear parcel tray, cup holders and bottle holders around the vehicle. There are also map pockets and floor console storage for additional space. Hyundai has really thought well about the Eon and its space management.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION ;

The Hyundai Eon in India gets a 3-cylinder engine that was developed at Hyundai’s R&D centre in Hyderabad. It’s the same engine as in the i10 with one cylinder removed to reduce displacement. It makes 56PS of max power along with 75Nm of torque which is the best in class. Driveability isn’t great with max torque being generated at a fairly high 4000rpm which means you have to constantly shift down to lower gears. In urban areas you will find yourself using second and third gears constantly and that also keeps the revs high.

At engine speeds above 3000rpm it sounds buzzy and scratchy and the sound only dies out considerably when you shift to higher gears and keep the revs low and that largely happens on the highway. Yet its NVH is within comfortable limits and unless revved hard this engine is a quiet operator. It’s also very similar in feel to the Alto’s 800cc engine, in first gear there is a small flat spot under 1500 rpm that intermittently also shows up in second gear. At times unless revved hard it feels like the engine is dying out even though you’ve engaged first gear and released the clutch. The 5-speed transmission is smooth to operate, however on another car it felt notchy. I guess these are some of the consistency issues that Hyundai will have to sort out. The ratios nonetheless are spaced out quite a bit to provide the best fuel efficiency rather than performance, yet first to third gears sees the Eon gain momentum quickly enough.

PERFORMANCE & EFFICIENCY

With a kerb weight of 725kilos the Eon has a decent 77.24PS per tonne though with the tall ratios don’t expect the Eon to make progress very fast. So 100kmph comes up in a lazy 19.08 seconds by which time you are also inching very close to the quarter mile mark, that’s how much distance it covers to get to 100kmph. The quarter mile then takes another eight tenths of a second. With the strong low and mid range but just noise at the top the Eon feels slow in the roll-ons. Third gear overtaking acceleration is decently fast but shift into fourth or fifth and the 40-100kmph runs feel like an eternity has passed, both runs recording well over 25 seconds. The Eon is quicker than the Alto by a slim margin but at nearly two seconds, a margin it is. That said all of Hyundai’s efforts have been put into fuel efficiency. According to the ARAI figures the Eon returns an overall of 21.1kmpl, on our test cycles however she returned 15.6kmpl in the city and on the highway a brilliant 24.3kmpl but the overall adds up to just 17.75kmpl which is much lesser than what Hyundai claims.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

The Eon uses MacPherson struts in front with a torsion beam suspension at the rear. The lower models use 145/80 R12 tubeless tyres while the higher models get 155/70 R13 tubeless tyres. The i10 and even the Santro have good ride quality and the Eon too delivers on this front. The ride is very absorbent and the soft suspension set-up offers good passenger comfort. The ground clearance too is good and this hatch is capable of handling broken roads well. On the highway the hatch is susceptible to cross winds, but having said that, there is no reason for concern and the Eon feels settled enough. Compared to the Alto the Eon rides much better. The steering is light and direct and not completely devoid of feel. Handling is good as well, but hard cornering produces fair amount of body roll.

SAFETY ;

The safety features of the Hyundai Eon include reinforced body structure, front and rear seat belts, child safety rear door locks, engine immobilizer, front fog lamps and driver airbag in one variant (Sportz).

CONCLUSSION ;

The Hyundai Eon has always made for a fine entry-level car but the lack of power did hurt those who were regularly driving over inclined roads or carrying occupants with them. With the boost in power, the Hyundai Eon makes a much stronger case for itself. Sure it is far from polished in the dynamics department and the rear seat lacks much space but when you look at the big picture, you simply can’t deny this car offers you more than your money’s worth, in terms of visuals (exterior and interiors). Only offered in Magna+ trim, the 1.0-litre Eon costs Rs. 34,000/- more than the 0.8-litre version in the same variant. For the extra money you pay, you get drastically better performance which transforms the experience of driving this car significantly.

 

Hyundai Creta Test Drive

OVERVIEW ;

As the Renault Captur launch is closing in, Hyundai has quietly made a few changes to the Creta. The new French SUV will be up against the Creta. It is stylish, looks premium and is built on the same Duster platform. There will not be diesel automatic in the start though. First is the addition of an all new colour, Earth Brown. This is made available with single and dual tone options. The Red Passion colour does offer the dual-tone roof option. The Pearl Beige colour has been discontinued. There will be a change in the colours on offer. This is a new change on the Hyundai Creta 2017.Moving on to the interiors, the SX+ dual tone variant comes with Luxure Brown interiors. This means addition of black and brown fabric seats with contrast stitching. The steering wheel and even the gear knob get brown stitches on it. Check On Road Price of Creta

EXTERIOR AND DESIGN ;

There are no significant changes made to the exterior of the SUV however it does get a new SX+ Dual tone trim which offers Piano Black Finish Roof Top & Sporty Black Spoiler. This new dual tone trim will be provided with two body colour combinations in the form of two colour combinations White & Black and Red & Black. This trim also gets a 17-inch diamond cut alloy rims which were only available with SX+ Auto and SX(O) until now.Apart from the changes mentioned above, there are no other changes made to the exterior of the SUV. The SUV is offered with a total of 9 exterior body colour options.

INTERIOR AND COMFORT ;

A long wheelbase of 2590 mm implies an opulent cabin, which translates into good head room, leg room and shoulder room. That said, the front offers impressive space and the rear has ample room, allowing to seat three adults comfortably. A high window line at the rear enables restricted view from the back. The dual-tone dashboard is perfectly styled and appears chic. The central console does not look cluttered. Use of beige and silver accent renders an elegant look to the cabin. The range-topping grade gets a 7-inch touchscreen, just beneath which are climate control buttons. Leather-upholstered seats are exclusively available on the range-topping variants while rest of the trims feature fabric-upholstered seats. Leather covering can be seen on the gear knob in the SX+ automatic variant only. Comfort goodies on offing include adjustable front head rests, keyless entry, power windows, height adjuster for the driver’s seat, adjustable rear seat head restraints, 7-inch infotainment system with steering-mounted controls for audio system and bluetooth, audio-video navigation, and smart key with push button, among few others.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

Hyundai always gives multiple powertrain options on its cars and same is the case with the Creta too. The compact SUV comes with two diesel engines and one petrol unit. Starting with the petrol mill, the 1.6-litre Dual VTVT engine generates 123 PS and 151 Nm, being matched to a 6-speed manual gearbox. The NVH levels on the vehicle are terrific, the petrol motor being barely audible even when you are driving at triple digit speeds, it does get vocal once you get past the mid-range. Low-end performance is where the petrol-powered Creta shines as the mid-range isn’t very strong while the top-end is quite lacking, it’s best to short shift using the smooth shifting gearbox and the light clutch. The ARAI claimed mileage is 15.29 km/l so real world mileage will be lesser.

Diesel is the more popular choice in this segment and Hyundai has 1.4-litre and 1.6-litre oil burners on offer. Both these engines also do duty on the Verna with the smaller diesel belting out 90 PS and 220 Nm. The 1.6 diesel is considerably more powerful with 128 PS and 260 Nm. Both the powerplants are matched to a 6-speed manual gearbox and Hyundai has managed to tune the transmission for butter smooth shifts, aided by a very light clutch. The 1.6 diesel has quite a lot of lag in the low-end so one does have to give it the beans in stop-go traffic as the turbo spools up in all its glory past 1900 RPM. The mid-range is the strong point of the motor while the power fades off quickly post 3800 RPM. When ambling in the city, downshifts are needed to get going quickly.

The 1.6 diesel mill is also matched to a 6-speed automatic gearbox. Although a single-clutch unit, it’s very responsive to throttle inputs and there is a tiptronic function on the lever so as to let one take care of shifts. When driven in D mode, performance from the motor is slick with the turbo lag not being very apparent. The 1.6 motor feels more linear in the automatic version but you miss the punchiness of the manual as the latter has the silence before the storm. The engine up shifts at around 4000 RPM and won’t stretch the motor all the way to the 5000 RPM redline which is encountered on the manual. 100 km/hr in sixth gear sees the tacho ticking in a shade above the 2000 RPM mark while the ton comes in third gear. The ARAI mileage for the 1.4 diesel is 21.38 km/l while the 1.6 diesel returns 19.67 km/l in manual guise and 17.01 km/l in automatic avatar.

DRIVING DYNAMICS ;

The Creta also has an absorbent ride. The suspension works silently even on heavily rutted sections of road, and bump absorption too is right up there with some of the best riding cars in its class. It may not ride as flat as the Renault Duster, and there may be a bit more movement of the body over bad roads, but the Hyundai comes close enough. Yes, sharp bumps filter through, and then the suspension does feel a bit fragile, but for the most part, especially at lower speeds, ride quality is excellent and Indian car buyers will like that.

What’s also surprisingly good is the steering of the car. To begin with, it is light and easy to twirl, and what makes it better is the fact that it feels direct, with not as great a sense of vagueness around the straight-ahead as you find in most Hyundai cars. Straight-line stability is good, and the steering weighs up nicely as you speed up too, but that weight does feel a bit artificial. We also found the Creta surprisingly willing to turn into corners. It does roll a bit on its tall suspension and does not grip the road with the confidence of the Renault Duster, but all things considered, the Creta is quite accomplished in corners too, which makes it a good all-rounder.

SAFETY FEATURES ;

The Hyundai Creta is jammed pack with all the possible gadgetry one can possibly ask for in a car of this price range. Touch screen infotainment – Check. GPS navigation – Check. Climate control – Check. Keyless entry with a start stop button – Check. Rear AC vents – Check. Quite simple, the Creta negate the need to go to an aftermarket accessories dealer to fit a bunch of tacky addons that may or may not work in the long term.On the safety front, you also get a set of airbags and more importantly, traction control. And while the latter may not send the hordes into a frenzy, considering most western countries require traction control as a standard fitment, having an extra layer of protection isn’t exactly a bad thing afterall.

CONCLUSSION ;

Hyundai has recently launched updated Elite i20 and now they have also decided to upgrade their Creta SUV as well. Unfortunately the 2017 model year SUV does not get any mechanical changes under the hood, but it does get a new infotainment system, a whole new trim and along with a new dual tone exterior shade.

 

BMW 1 Series Review,Price & specifications

OVERVIEW

BMW has taken heed to critics of the 1 Series, who grumbled that the looks were challenging and the engine range spiralling. Solution? Its biggest facelift ever, introducing a far sharper nose, a much nicer rear end and some stonking new engines that further its performance and eco credentials over rivals. The BMW 1 Series has never been better.

It still comes in three-door and five-door guise, with badges aligned to the BMW 2 Series (so they bear little relation to engine capacity…) and BMW’s simplified the trim line-up. The old one was a top 10 best-seller regular. BMW’s aiming for more of the same with this.

EXTERIORS

The BMW 1-Series isn’t an attractive looking car and there are no two ways about it. In reality the 1-Series has given birth to the X1 but in India the X1 came first and thus the 1-Series appears to be a X1 turned into a hatchback. The end result is a car which although proudly boasts of the BMW badge on its long hood, doesn’t solicit a second glance on the road. The 116i comes with 16-inch wheels which look a bit puny on this car. The rear is very plain too and overall this vehicle doesn’t make a visual impression. In spite of being in the market for more than 8 months now, the styling fails to grow on you.

INTERIORS

Every car in the 1 Series range has a standard 6.5in colour screen, mounted on top of the centre console. It’s controlled via the iDrive system, which is one of the most intuitive and user-friendly interfaces around. There is a large rotary control wheel near the gearstick, with simple shortcut buttons for all the major functions. The graphics are slick and the menus only take a moment to get your head around.

Bluetooth and audio streaming, a single CD player, a DAB digital radio, multifunction steering wheel and USB connection are also standard across the range, with the option to upgrade to an excellent Harman Kardon stereo, or even a larger display screen and sat-nav with real time traffic information and mobile internet services, plus a 12GB music hard drive, as part of the BMW Professional package. Only the 116d ED Plus model gets sat-nav as standard.

Fit and finish in the BMW 1 Series is well above average, although a few pieces of trim – especially the door pockets and the glovebox lid – feel quite hard and scratchy. There’s a nice mixture of brushed metal and gloss black surfaces in higher spec cars, but they can also be fitted as options on entry-level models.

All the major controls are solidly built and robust, although the indicator stalks and stereo controls are made from harder, flimsier plastics. In terms of its rivals, the Audi A3 and the Volkswagen Golf feel plusher, but only by a narrow margin.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION

A pair of four-cylinder engines power this smallest of BMWs, one petrol and one diesel. The 1,995cc ‘N47’ diesel is a familiar one; we’ve already seen it in ‘20d’ guise in the 3-series, 5-series, X1 and X3, as well as in the 525d. However, here, in the 118d, it makes 141bhp and 32.6kgm. These figures still compare favourably with the diesel engines of its closest rivals, the A-class and the V40 Cross Country.

A pleasant surprise is that it is quite refined; almost more so than a 3-series. The NVH levels are impressively low, both at idle and on the go, and it gets harsh only near the top of the rev range. This milder state of tune suggests less aggressive turbo-charging, which means less noise.

The power delivery is smooth. This engine is incredibly linear for a diesel, and while you enjoy the almost petrol-like journey up the power band, you do miss that characteristic surge of torque that you get in the mid-range with most diesel engines. So, is the mid-range weak? No – it’s just a bit flatter than you’d expect, and if you’re worried about being able to pull off an overtake on a whim, the gearbox is there to help. The eight-speed ZF automatic, also shared with the bigger Bimmers, works brilliantly in the 1-series. With the ‘Driving Experience Control’ switch set in the default Comfort mode, the shifts are soft and seamless, and the gearbox is still decently quick to react to pedal inputs. In Eco Pro mode, the ’box can’t wait to upshift, and even if you’re cruising at 60-70kph, that’s good enough for eighth gear

Put it in Sport or Sport+, however, and you’d better have a clear stretch of road, because the engine responses quicken and the transmission just darts through the gears. Keep your foot in, and it won’t shift up until its 4,800rpm redline. Overall, the power delivery gets in its stride at about 1,500rpm, and builds strongly till about 4,000rpm. The 118d hits 100kph in 9.02sec, just 0.4sec after the V40 and much ahead of the diesel A-class.

The petrol is a 1,598cc, direct-injection, turbocharged motor that makes a healthy 134bhp and 24.47kgm of torque on overboost. Like the diesel, it is only available with the ZF automatic and that’s a good thing. Unlike the earlier, naturally aspirated BMW petrols that loved to be revved but had weak mid-ranges, this turbo-petrol has a meaty and wide torque curve. The ZF ’box masks whatever minimal turbo lag there is and the engine will spin happily to 6,500rpm, accompanied by a nice exhaust snarl and a muted turbo whistle.

DRIVING DYNAMICS

Figures aside, there are four driving modes – one for every mood. The Eco Pro, for the one off occasions when you feel like driving in the economy mode; then there is the comfort mode, again something that will be sparingly used. The Sport+ mode, which automatically switches off the ESP, is sure to bring an ear to ear smile on your face. The steering feels heavier than in the other modes but continues to remain as precise and responsive which makes it that much more fun to push around corners. The 225/45 R17 tyres make their contribution in ensuring that you feel confident while carrying speed into round a bend. The 1 series not only handles amazingly but is also quite comfortable even on bumpy and rough tarmac. The suspension is well damped and easily absorbs all the undulations that the road throws at it without letting out a single twitch to put your comfort levels in question.

SAFETY FEATURES

Euro NCAP has recently made its crash tests more stringent, but the 1 Series scored highly in the old tests with a five-star result, and did well in all areas except pedestrian protection.

There are six airbags and tyre pressure-monitoring on all models, and run-flat tyres are included on many models. However, the 1 Series doesn’t get emergency automatic braking, adaptive cruise control or collision detection.

At least security body Thatcham rates it highly for being difficult to break into, or steal from.

CONCLUSSION

If you need a reduced and truly lively hatchback that consolidates solid execution with light-footed back wheel-drive taken care of, one and only auto will figure on your shopping rundown: the BMW 1 Series. The BMW 1 Series has earned the full five stars in the NCAP accident tests and gloats an especially great grown-up inhabitant assurance rating of 91%. Early-life unwavering quality is great, however as the miles mount up, it has a notoriety for giving inconvenience.

 

Tata Indica Review,Price,Specifications & Test Drive

OVERVIEW

The Tata Indica has no doubt shaped the Indian car market by being a product with many firsts. It was the first Indian car to have AC and power windows as standard, features which were found only on sedans. The Indica has made the common man consider cars as it was the only hatchback in its hay days to feature a diesel engine, thereby making sense in running costs. Now 15-years down the line, Tata Motors continues to sell the same Indica, which has been updated several times. What doesn’t change though is the shape. The Tata Indica has evolved but it’s no Porsche 911 that it won’t look dated. The Indica even with frequent make ups has started to show its age. However the Indian automobile giant continues to sell it by calling it the “new Indica” every time it facelifts it. Does the Tata Indica make sense when you can get more modern vehicles at this price? We take a quick spin to answer that very question.

EXTERIOR AND LOOKS

The Indica is not a car which will win hearts for its looks. The Italians who are normally well known for the things they design didn’t seem to have done justice with this hatch. It looks very dated and bland. The design has not seen any substantial change since the time it was launched in 1998.One thing that we surely want Tata Motors to do is a complete makeover instead of just changing a few bits. So what differentiates this Indica from the earlier models? The Spanish Tan is a new addition which indeed looks better if not the best. The radiator grille has a bright coated finish which looks contrasting with the new shade The front face has been retained from the earlier generation models. The headlight assembly has turn indicators in them. The side profile is unmistakably same. Nothing has been changed in 15 years which doesn’t go in Indica’s favor. The ORVMs are equipped with turn indicators in them but then it is not a modern touch as many other models have it.The rear profile gets re-touched tail lamps and a subtle chrome garnish on the tail gate. The exterior profile fails to create any enthusiasm and looks very dated.

INTERIOR AND CABIN

The interior of Tata Indica eV2 is tastefully done and definitely impresses even in a cursory glance. Unlike other hatchbacks, it is loaded with some incredible features. The rack and pinion type steering wheel has four spokes and the instrument panel is very chic. Adding to passenger convenience are features like reading lamps, a cabin lamp that is operatable from all four doors, a lamp in the boot, a utility tray with a coin holder and a parcel shelf. The horn pad for the steering wheel, moulded roof lining, internal antenna and the door trims are other likeable features of this hatch. The dashboard is the same heritage Indica type and the music system is also the unchanged one with bluetooth connectivity and an aux-in port. Tata Indica eV2 can accommodate five passengers and the comfortable seating is lined with soft fabric. The Air Conditioning unit is very effective and makes the ride very comfortable. The electronic instrument cluster has a digital odometer, 2 trip meters with light intensity control, a tachometer and a digital clock. The painted floor Console comes with the provision for Mobile Charger / Cigarette Lighter. The boot space of 220 L is adequate and adds to the convenience value of this car. The headroom offered is quite significant with 960 mm in the front and 940 mm at the rear. Legroom available ranges from 915 mm to 1080 mm; and the knee room available ranges between 640 mm and 750 mm. Taller passengers need not worry as India offers a generous shoulder room of 1335 mm.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE

The Indica has two diesel engines, petrol and also a LPG version of the petrol motor. The 1.2-litre petrol develops 65PS@5200 rpm with a peak torque of 100Nm@2600rpm. 100kmph is reached in under 17seconds with a top speed of 155kmph and an ARAI claimed fuel efficiency of 16.54kmpl. Despite the mediocre performance the engine feels strong enough on the highway and with decent drivability in urban conditions. Mid range power delivery is good but the engine starts to show its weakness over 4000rpm.

The 1.4-litre diesel engine produces 54PS@5500rpm and 85PS@2250rpm. Refinement is poor and it delivers 17.88kmpl as claimed by ARAI. The 1.3-litre common rail diesel engine is sourced from Fiat and develops70PS@4000rpm and 140Nm between1800 to 3000rpm. This engine feels far more refined but isn’t as quick as on the Maruti Suzuki Swift. All engines use a five speed manual gearbox which feels rubbery and offers a vague response.

HANDLING AND SAFETY

In the city, there is no lack of poke. The Indica trundles through the traffic in third at 1500 rpm without a fuss. Downshifts are no longer a bother as the gearshift quality has been upped with each version of the Indica. The gearshift feels smooth, though some of the sogginess remains. Sudden overtaking manoeuvres can also be attempted and executed with gusto. However, the handling remains wishy-washy; the rear slides out at the hint of a slalom style manoeuvre and the steering does little to inspire confidence in pushing the car hard. The steering is well damped at low speeds, but lacks feedback and remains a little sluggish at high speeds. Tata Motors’ attempted part remedy for the weak-kneed handling are lower profile 165/60 R13 Goodyear GPS2’s. The low-profile tyres limit the car’s rolling tendency by a certain degree. The Airbags and ABS are now available in the Aura + segment of cars. The only thing that the Indica misses dearly are the alloy wheels.

CONCLUSSION

As can be seen, not much has changed and the Tata Indica continues to soldier on in the same manner as it used to last year. Tata Motors has recovered the development and fixed costs) of the Indica long time back so it makes a lot of financial sense to keep the car going in its current form. Sure the Indica makes a lot of sense for taxi operators with its generous cabin, attractive price and high fuel economy. But if the company wants to lure private buyers, the Indica needs a bigger update, a more substantial one which will help it stand strong in front of more established and better engineered products.

Tata Indica Ls Bs Iv Ex-showroom Price is   4,99,674/- and On Road Price is   5,79,416/- in Hyderabad.On Road price of Tata Indica in Banglors visit carzprize.com

 

 

Hyundai Elantra Review,Price,Specifications & Features

OVERVIEW ;

Hyundai has introduced the sixth-generation Elantra for the 2017 model year, bringing with it an all-new exterior design, and a driver-oriented cabin that is more in-line with the Sonata. On the outside, the car got a new hexagonal grille that takes up a majority of the front fascia. On the front corners, there are recesses in the bumper that house LED fog lamps. These recesses look similar to the fog lamp units on the previous generation. Overall, the exterior is more refined than before with less of that “fluidic” design. Even the taillights are less aggressive that the last-gen model. Inside, the instrument cluster gets a 4.2-inch color display between the two primary gauges, and upper trim levels come standard with leather upholstery. A seven-inch touch screen display is standard equipment, but an eight-inch screen is available on some models. Under the hood, Hyundai gave the Elantra two new engines – a 2.0-liter with 147 horsepower and a 1.4-liter with 128 horsepower.

The Elantra may seem like it is a little underpowered in a world where smaller vehicles often come with closer to 200 horsepower, but what it is lacking it power is made up with comfort, and economy. Competing against models like the Honda Civic and Chevy Cruze, economy and comfort are huge selling points, so the lack of power isn’t all the big of a deal anyway. So, how does the new Elantra compete with the competition otherwise? Well, check out our detailed review below to find out for yourself.

DESIGN AND STYLE ;

Where the Elantra has seen a major change is its design. The new Elantra looks stylish and appealing. It now looks a lot more mature and upmarket. The Fluidic Design 2.0 is what makes it look more premium. The dimensions of the Elantra haven’t changed much. The new front grille is larger and looks premium.

The side profile will remind you of the Elantra. Now it looks more sporty. The sloping roof melds well with the boot design. A nicely integrated spoiler forms the rear of the new Elantra. This seems to be more like a European sedan than a Hyundai design. The tail lamps are also stylish and trendy. It does look and feel like a premium sedan.

CABIN AND COMFORT ;

Once you enter the cabin you get a feel of a German car the way the dashboard is designed. Just like the exteriors, the new Elantra now offers mature interior styling which looks uncluttered and user friendly than before. The cabin is all-black with brushed silver elements and the roof is finished in light grey which really makes you feel that you are in a proper D-segment sedan. The three-spoke steering feels great to hold and there are integrated buttons to control the infotainment system, cruise control and the big MID display in the instrument cluster as well. The instrument cluster is very informative and easy to read. Unlike many Hyundai cars, it shows distance to empty and average fuel consumption.

The 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen system is the party piece of the new Hyundai Elantra. It’s one of the biggest screens in the segment having a very user friendly interface with smooth performance. The touch quality is very good and you don’t see any lag while swiping between menus. It offers Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity which makes it more convenient to access your phone data and it even has voice recognition. Sound quality is excellent and even the navigation system looks modern having informative display. The big screen also doubles up as a rear parking camera display, which makes it a breeze to park this big sedan.

You get dual-zone automatic climate control system which has a strong and silent airflow all the way to the rear passengers with the help of rear aircons. The cooling is super effective and the front ventilated seats adds to the comfort in the scorching heat of summers in India. The centre console is very neat and tidy, there is no clutter of buttons and the dashboard looks pleasant. The fit and finish is excellent, it’s hard to find any rough edges or bad plastics in the car and quality is Hyundai’s forte, which you won’t complaint about.

There are a lot of storage places to keep your bottles and knick knacks. The dashboard has cooling function but no illumination. There is a neat tray ahead of the gear lever with a smooth sliding action that looks cool. Because of the all-black theme you might think that it doesn’t looks spacious but there is ample room for both front and rear passengers. The light coloured roof adds to some airiness along with the sunroof, which is a tad small in size. The rear seat cushioning is perfect with good support. Legroom is excellent but headroom for tall passengers is just average. Sadly there are no controls on the arm rest for the rear passengers and even no socket to charge your phone or laptop at the back. The boot is huge and you can fit in a lot of luggage. It has an interesting feature of hands-free smart trunk with which you can open the boot without putting any effort. Some of the key features include keyless entry and go, 10-way power adjustable seat, drive mode select, etc.

ENGINE AND GEARBOX ;

Under the hood of the new Elantra will sit one of two engine options – the familiar 128hp, 1,582cc ‘D4FB U2’ diesel and a brand new 152hp, 1,999cc ‘Nu MPi’ naturally aspirated petrol engine; yes, while the rest of the world is downsizing and turbocharging, the new Elantra’s motor is larger than its predecessor’s. Whichever engine you choose, you then have the choice of a six-speed manual or a six-speed torque-converter automatic, so really, all bases have been covered with this car.The familiar engine first. The 1.6-litre CRDi turbo-diesel has powered not only the previous Elantra, but also the Verna and the Creta in India. While in those other two cars, its 128hp and 260Nm of torque are class leading, in the Elantra, they fall behind the competition (apart from the Toyota Corolla Altis), as does the engine’s displacement – 2.0-litres is the norm here. In everyday driving, the lack of displacement and power isn’t too much of an issue, and the Elantra diesel is quite happy at city speeds, thanks to its smooth and linear nature. Even on the highway, sure, you’ll feel a bit of strain when you drop down from sixth to fifth in the manual car and go for an overtake, but it does still cruise quite comfortably otherwise.

Interestingly, it’s the old-school six-speed auto that highlights the engine’s lack of oomph, as the shift points are out of your control. Whereas in the manual, you would probably shift up a little before the redline, say at 3,500rpm, to keep progress smooth, in the automatic, if you bury your foot, it will run all the way to the redline and that brings with it a lot of strain (until this point, the engine is impressively refined). What’s more, there are no paddles for you to select gears manually with, but you can use the gear lever itself. The other issue we had with the auto was that it was a little over-enthusiastic to shift gears. Very often, even the slightest drop in revs or smallest twitch of the accelerator pedal would cause an unpredictable upshift or a downshift, adding unnecessary interruptions to progress.

It’s a similar experience with the six-speed automatic on the petrol car – although it is smooth, there are no shift paddles and it can be a bit hyperactive with its shifts at low speeds. However, the new 2.0-litre petrol motor is a very different animal from the diesel. While the unnecessary upshifts are somewhat blunted by the diesel engine’s relaxed nature, the petrol engine is super responsive at low revs. This means, in the petrol automatic, you have to be judicious with your throttle inputs at lower speeds to make jerk-free progress, but once you’re used to it, it’s quite enjoyable. Paired with the added control of a manual shifter and a clutch pedal, the petrol motor is even more enjoyable; it’s one of the most responsive at low revs that we’ve ever tested. This makes it very well suited to stop-and-go traffic, letting you jump off the line briskly and cut into gaps with minimal effort. There is a small flat spot in the power delivery, just below 2,000rpm, after which the mid-range builds up in earnest. It revs out very smoothly and quickly, making you want to push it harder, but it never quite delivers that same punch you’d get from, say, an equivalent Honda engine. Refinement is good, and it’s not until 3,000rpm that you start to hear the motor in the car. But, while both motors are impressively quiet, you do hear quite a bit of wind and tyre noise inside the Elantra.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

This brings us to one of the biggest improvements we experienced in the new Elantra – its ride. I spent a good hour on the back seat, most of it in amazement as my colleague driving the car did everything possible to make me come back to the empty front seat.At low speeds the car gracefully absorbs bad roads and speed breakers unlike any of its predecessors. And as you go faster and faster over road undulations the new suspension setup and damping system ensures that the car car quickly settles back and doesn’t bob around like before. The newly introduced Vehicle Stability Management system further aids this cause. This is a big transformation and a step in the right direct by Hyundai India.

The steering is still light and helps while manoeuvring in the city or parking this 4.5-metre car. It does weigh up a bit as the car gathers speed but, being electrically assisted, it isn’t as communicative as some hydraulic steering setup. Apart from this we would have also liked some more bite and better feel from the brakes.

BRAKING AND SAFETY ;

Front and rear axles get disc brakes, which work mutually with evidently robust braking equipments, such as anti-lock braking system with electronic brake force distribution. Brake assist is missing from the adept braking system. From the safety brigade, Elantra gets dual front airbags equipped in all variants, while side and curtain airbags are confined to the SX and SX AT trims.

Some of the other safety features present in the SX and SX AT variants include electronic stability control, speed sensing auto door lock, vehicle stability management and automatic headlight control. The only feature available exquisitely in the SX AT trims is hill start control. Preeminent safety equipments proffered as standard among all variants are rear parking sensors, impact sensing door unlock, clutch lock, rear defogger with timer, front height adjustable seatbelts with seatbelt pretensioners and ignition key reminder. The diesel base variant comes bereft of electro chromic mirror bestowed on the rest of the trims.

BOTTOMLINE ;

The Elantra is an insanely important model in Hyundai’s lineup. Since 2012, the Elantra has sold more than 200,000 units each year in the U.S. alone. That beats both the Accent by nearly 150,000 annually and Sonata by roughly 30,000 units annually. Needless to say, the Korean automaker has a lot riding on the Elantra’s redesign.It seems Hyundai has done its homework though, as the completely revised car seems far more refined, modern, larger, and more technology-laden. Its smart new looks and updated engine options should attract buyers looking for something that isn’t a crossover, but who still want all the bells and whistles automakers are loading in those high-riding station wagons.

Audi A3 Overvew,Test Drive,Specifications,Mileage & Price In India

OVERVIEW ;

Given the full LED headlamps, the massive hexagonal grille and those taut shoulder lines, you might think you are looking at Audi’s new A4 here, when in fact this is the noticeably more affordable A3 which has been comprehensively updated for 2017. Armed with Audi’s latest design language, improved feature list and a new petrol motor, the 2017 A3 makes for an attractive proposition. Here’s what has changed and how.

EXTERIOR DESIGN ;

For starters, it looks a lot similar to the A4 now thanks to the redesigned LED DRLs. The car that we got, featured all LED headlamps as well, though it is not a part of the standard kit. It now sports the hexagonal ‘Diamond-inspired’ single frame grille as a part of the family design. The front bumper has been redesigned and features slimmer air vents that lend a sporty appeal to the styling. The shoulder line is more prominent and at the rear, the tail lamps retain their shape but the detailing is now different and also boast dynamic turn indicators, like the ones on the new A4.

The rear bumper has been given an overhaul as well and now looks a bit more aggressive and sporty. Panoramic sunroof though is standard across the range. It also now runs on new 16-inch alloys shod with Bridgestone or Michelin rubber.

INTRIOR DESIGN ;

The A3’s interior isn’t very different from other Audis, but there are a few things that will make you sit up and take notice. The first thing is the MMI screen – it pops up out of a slot at the top of the centre console, which is very impressive. Paired to this is the rotary knob on the centre console which has a touchpad on the top. This is much like a laptop computer’s mousepad, and you can write on it with a finger and it will recognise the letters, no matter how bad the handwriting. (We tried it, it works.) The second is the new design of the air vents. Audi says they’re modelled on a jet fighter’s turbines. Claims of turbofan resemblance aside, they are very pretty things, and the bezels have to be rotated to cut airflow. The crowning glory is the central circle – pull to focus airflow, and push for a diffused effect. This should help in cooling all of you equally rather than just one ear or your fingers.

All the usual bells and whistles are present – leather upholstery with contrasting stitching, a very nice four-spoke steering wheel, a multi-function display, a CD player with different multimedia options and a 20 GB hard drive, and dual zone climate control. The AC is effective and has a rear blower as well. Sat nav is an optional extra for some variants but is standard for the top-spec variant.

The seats are comfortable, of course, but tall people should stick to the front. The rear is surprisingly roomy for the car’s size (and roofline), with just enough headroom and knee room for a six-footer. Three abreast is going to be a big ask, though. Two at the rear will be comfortable, what with the armrest and dual cupholders and even a 12V socket exclusively for the rear seat. The A3 gets access via the central armrest recess at the rear to the 425 litre boot, which is a lot larger than that figure suggests. If it isn’t large enough for you, the rear seats split and fold flat for greater convenience.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

The 2017 A3 comes with a choice of two power-plants – a 1.4-litre TFSI turbo petrol and the familiar 2-litre TDI diesel. Whereas the former is paired to a 7-speed dual-clutch gearbox, the more efficient diesel works in conjunction with a 6-speeder – also a dual clutch unit.

Starting with the petrol variant, Audi has replaced the old 1.8-litre TFSI unit in favour of this 1.4-litre motor which makes 150bhp and 250Nm of torque between 1,500 and 3,000rpm. Unlike its competition, the petrol powered A3 comes with cylinder-on-demand tech, which shuts down two of the four cylinders when you’re just pottering around. Then, as you floor it, all four cylinders fire up for maximum thrust.

Within city limits, the motor is surprisingly brisk, pulling strongly from around 2,000rpm. But despite making as much torque as the 1.8-litre unit, the new A3 doesn’t pull as hard as the older car. Where the 1.8-litre motor pushed you back in your seat, the 1.4-litre motor feels more linear and laidback in the way it goes about its business. As for refinement, the new A3 offers impressively low NVH, with a near silent idle and staying composed till about 4000rpm. Its only near the redline that the motor gets a bit loud. The 7-speed gearbox is undoubtedly quicker to respond than the competition and teamed with this engine’s eager power delivery, the surge of acceleration is addictive. The only downside to the gearbox is the jerky low speed behaviour and delay in response as you floor the throttle.

The 2-litre diesel continues to offer strong mid-range punch. It may be a little noisy when worked hard but it never feels vibey or harsh. Like in the older car, there is more than sufficient pulling power, all of which is efficiently transferred to the road via a 6-speed dual clutch automatic. Like its petrol-powered counterpart, gearshifts are rapid and smooth on the go but the overall response is a little jerky at crawling speeds.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

What we have here is, quite simply, one of the sweetest-handling Audi sedans we’ve come across in years. We’ve always found the handling of the bigger As to be really competent, but this one adds another element – fun. It’s simply a joy to chuck around corners, and that’s down to a number of factors. Primarily, it’s the very stiff chassis, which has allowed Audi to give the A3 softer suspension without corrupting the dynamics. Then there’s the steering, which though still not perfect, feels miles more direct and full of feel than just about any other recent Audi. The end result is a car that will eagerly dart into corners as quickly as you dare throw it. It feels light on its feet, there’s not too much understeer, with loads of grip, despite the lack of Quattro, and the body roll is all but imperceptible.

As for the ride, in the diesel, with its stiffer front end, you will feel a bit more of what’s going on under the tyres, particularly at city speeds over, for instance, a poorly paved piece of tarmac. Even so, it’s not as firm as the Mercedes A-class, and Audi’s equivalent of a ‘rough road package’ for India (read: added stiffness) seems to have been calibrated perfectly for our conditions. The petrol model is even better, with a slightly softer edge, especially when you consider our test cars were top-spec, wearing 17-inch wheels on 45-profile tyres. It’s impressive that Audi has managed to achieve this sort of compliance without the adaptive suspension trickery that you find in the bigger cars. The only fly in the ointment is road noise, and a fair bit of it comes into the cabin as you pick up speed. All said and done, Audi has nailed the ride and handling package on the A3, and for once it’s something we hope filters upwards into the next A4.

SAFETY ;

The Audi A3 received 5-stars in the Euro NCAP crash test. There are abundant safety features on offer and the car feels very well built. Front and side airbags are standard across the range and the higher end models also get rear airbags and knee airbag for the driver. Besides the standard ABS, the A3 is also equipped with ‘Electronic Stability Control’ (ESC) and ‘Electronic Limited Slip Differential’ as standard.

VERDICT ;

The A3 has a lot going for it – it looks great, especially in scarlet with 17-inch rims, has a ton of features that aren’t present at the price, and has enough performance to keep customers happy. It is also a first mover in the segment. Surprisingly, at the price that we expect it to go on sale, Rs 26-28 lakh, it will be great value for money as well, so we have no doubt that should Audi stick to that price, it will have another great product flying off their shelves.